Author: Community Health Net

December is National Influenza Awareness Month

The Flu is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system. It can result in serious health complications that could lead to hospitalization and even death.  

Get the Facts

  • The Flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and – sometimes – the lungs. 
  • People with influenza can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away.  
  • People with the Flu are most contagious in the first three to four days after their illness begins.
  • The Flu is different from a cold. Unlike a cold, it usually comes on suddenly.
  • Flu viruses are spread mainly by tiny droplets made when infected people cough, sneeze or talk.
  • Flu viruses are most common during the fall and winter.

People at higher risk of developing flu complications include:

  • Young children under age 5, and especially those under six months.
  • Adults older than age 65.
  • Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
  • Pregnant women and women up to two weeks after giving birth.
  • People with weakened immune systems.
  • Native Americans.
  • People who have chronic illnesses, such as asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, and diabetes.
  • People who are very obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher.

Take Action

  • The best way to prevent the Flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year.
  • Where a mask.
  • Practice social distancing.

Call your medical provider if you have the following symptoms:

  • Fever.
  • Aching muscles.
  • Chills and sweats.
  • Headache.
  • Dry, persistent cough.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Tiredness and weakness.
  • Runny or stuffy nose.
  • Sore throat.
  • Eye pain.
  • Vomiting and diarrhea (more common in children than adults).

Seek immediate medical attention if you have the following symptoms:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Ongoing dizziness
  • Seizures
  • Worsening of existing medical conditions
  • Severe weakness or muscle pain

Emergency signs and symptoms in children can include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Blue lips
  • Chest pain
  • Dehydration
  • Severe muscle pain
  • Seizures
  • Worsening of existing medical condition

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule your flu shot today!  Call (814) 455-7222. 

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

 

November is COPD Awareness Month

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects millions of Americans. It is the third leading cause of disease-related death in the U.S. The good news is that COPD is often preventable and treatable. If you or a loved one has COPD, there are steps to take to cope with the lifestyle changes this disease brings.

Get the Facts

  • COPD is a lung disease that makes it hard to breathe.
  • COPD is almost always caused by smoking.
  • COPD gets worse over time. You cannot undo the damage to your lungs.
  • Many people don’t recognize the symptoms of COPD until the later stages of the disease.
  • Some think they are short of breath or less able to go about their normal activities because they are “just getting older.”
  • COPD is most common in people who are older than 60.
  • People who have COPD are more likely to get lung infections.

Take Action

If you experience any of the following symptoms or think you might be at risk for COPD, it is essential to discuss this with your doctor:

  • Chronic cough.
  • Shortness of breath while doing everyday activities (dyspnea).
  • Frequent respiratory infections.
  • Blueness of the lips or fingernail beds (cyanosis).
  • Fatigue.
  • Producing a lot of mucus (also called phlegm or sputum).
  • Wheezing.

The best way to slow COPD is to quit smoking. It is never too late to quit. No matter how long you have smoked or how severe your COPD is, quitting smoking can help stop the damage to your lungs. Also, consider the following:

  • Avoid things that can irritate your lungs, such as smoke and air pollution.
  • Use an air filter in your home.
  • Get regular exercise to stay as strong as you can.
  • Eat well so you can keep up your strength.
  • Maintain good mental health.

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

New Patient Concierge Service

We are proud to introduce a new Patient Concierge Service from Community Health Net! We now provide free transportation to and from your appointments for patients of our 1202 State Street location, with walk-up, door-to-door service! To request our Patient Concierge Service, call 814-455-7222, or speak to a member of your Care Team during your next visit!

More Information

  • You must live within a 10-mile radius of our 1202 State Street location.
  • You must be a patient at our 1202 State Street location.
  • Our Patient Concierge Service operates on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 am until 3:30 pm.
  • You must submit a request for our Patient Concierge Service 24 hours before your appointment time.

Community Health Net Reports Record 2020-2021 Fiscal Year with $4.4m in Net Assets, Grows Cash Reserves by 50 Percent

The organization continues to show improvement in cash flow and liquidity. 

 

Erie, Pa. – October 26, 2021 – Community Health Net (CHN), the leading Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) serving the Lake Erie region, announced that it ended its fiscal year at its strongest financial position to date, with $4.4m in net assets. Additionally, CHN grew its cash reserves by 50% and implemented telehealth services while experiencing burdens generated by the pandemic.

“The pandemic years of 2020 and 2021 have thus far been very stressful on all of us and especially our community’s and nation’s healthcare system. At CHN, we have faced this challenging event head-on to improve the quality of life for the residents in our region,“ said Craig Ulmer, CEO of Community Health Net.  “We are committed to doing what needs to be done for our community’s health and well-being during these uncertain times. Although this has proven to be a difficult task, we have succeeded.“

Before the pandemic, CHN had significantly changed its culture, streamlined operations, and improved its patient services.  These efforts have resulted in many public successes, including Community Health Net being named “Best-in-Class Equity Performer” by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in 2021.  Additionally, the changes gave the organization the agility to successfully navigate the pandemic, provide quality health services, and remain financially strong.

“As reflected in the key performance indicators, CHN continues to show improvement in cash flow and liquidity. From a trending perspective, and due in part to a number of the [grant] awards, our cash reserves grew by 50%, and our ratio climbed to 4.05,” said Cindy DeDionisio, Chief Financial Officer at Community Health Net. “Even while dealing with the impact of the pandemic, we were able to maintain the days in accounts receivable at 30 days. This is a positive indication of our strengthening cash and is exceedingly better than the typical metric for most health centers. In addition, CHN continues to excel in financial compliance through numerous successful audits and fiscal site visit reviews.”

While the pandemic hindered some growth efforts, Community Health Net moved quickly to serve its community through COVID testing and vaccinations. As a result, the organization added over 1000 new patients, provided nearly 6000 vaccinations (including 1st doses, 2nd doses, and several boosters). In addition, through a diverse menu of healthcare services, including telehealth options, CHN provided more than 36,000 patient visits and nearly 30,000 pharmacy prescriptions.

 

About Community Health Net
Community Health Net is a Federally Qualified Health Center with seven locations and greater than 35 years of service. CHN is the preeminent, community-focused healthcare network advancing the wellness of the Lake Erie Region.  Its mission is to improve the region’s quality of life by providing professional healthcare services with compassion, respect, and dignity to all.

Pennsylvania Association of Community Health Centers Names Community Health Net CEO to Board of Directors

This governance role supports Pennsylvania’s primary care association for community health centers, serving more than 900,000 patients annually.

 

Erie, Pa. – October 19, 2021 – Community Health Net (CHN), the leading Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) serving the Lake Erie region, announced that its Chief Executive Officer, Craig Ulmer, has been appointed to the board of directors of the Pennsylvania Association of Community Health Centers (PACHC). The organization is Pennsylvania’s primary care association (PCA) for community health centers, serving more than 917,000 patients annually at 330-plus sites in underserved rural and urban areas.

“It is an honor to be chosen for such important role in support of a vital state-wide institution that fights to ensure affordable, quality health care for all,“ said Craig Ulmer, CEO of Community Health Net. “I am proud to represent our underserved communities in Erie and throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.“

Since 1981, PACHC programs and services, including but not limited to healthcare quality, legislative, regulatory, and policy advocacy, have supported health centers in their mission to improve access to affordable, quality primary care for all.

PACHC’s Board of Directors is composed of Community Health Center chief executive officers throughout the Commonwealth. The network of health centers includes Community Health Centers (FQHCs and FQHC Look-Alikes), Rural Health Clinics, and other like-mission providers.

“The decision of our members to elect Craig Ulmer to our Board of Directors was both logical and natural. He is a capable and proven leader who has managed to shape a successful community health care center in the state’s third largest city,” said Cheri Rinehart, President & Chief Executive Officer of the Pennsylvania Association of Community Health Centers, the association representing the largest network of primary health care providers in the Commonwealth. “Craig is truly committed to the health center mission of improving access to equitable, quality, affordable medical, dental and behavioral health care. We are delighted to benefit from his leadership and experience on the PACHC board of directors.”

Ulmer, a 35-year veteran of CHN, assumed the role of CEO in 2017, shortly after the company completed an intensive strategic planning process that culminated in a new vision, mission, values, and 10-year goals. Since then, the organization has significantly changed its culture, streamlined operations, and improved its patient services under his leadership. These efforts have resulted in a series of public successes, including Community Health Net being named “Best-in-Class Equity Performer” by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in 2021, amid the global pandemic.

About Community Health Net
Community Health Net is a Federally Qualified Health Center with seven locations and greater than 35 years of service. CHN is the preeminent, community-focused healthcare network advancing the wellness of the Lake Erie Region. Its mission is to improve the region’s quality of life by providing professional healthcare services with compassion, respect, and dignity to all.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Although over 10 million U.S. adults experience domestic violence annually, it can affect everyone regardless of age, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion, or nationality.

 

Get the Facts

  • Domestic violence is the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another. It includes physical violence, sexual violence, threats, economic, and emotional/psychological abuse.
  • Every year millions of children are exposed to domestic violence.
  • Domestic violence is prevalent in every community and affects all people regardless of age, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, gender, race, religion, or nationality.
  • Physical violence is often accompanied by emotionally abusive and controlling behavior as part of a much larger, systematic pattern of dominance and control.
  • Domestic violence can result in physical injury, psychological trauma, and even death.
  • An average of 20 people are physically abused by intimate partners every minute. This equates to more than 10 million abuse victims annually.
  • 1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have been physically abused by an intimate partner, and 1 in 5 women and 1 in 7 men have been severely physically abused by an intimate partner.
  • The COVID-19 pandemic and the accompanying lock-downs, social distancing, and other mitigation measures have only exacerbated domestic violence.

Take Action

Know the Warning Signs of Partner Abuse in a Relationship

  • Telling you that you never do anything right.
  • Showing extreme jealousy of your friends and time spent away from them.
  • Preventing or discouraging you from spending time with friends, family members, or peers.
  • Insulting, demeaning, or shaming you, especially in front of other people.
  • Preventing you from making your own decisions, including about working or attending school.
  • Controlling finances in the household without discussion, including taking your money or refusing to provide money for necessary expenses.
  • Pressuring you to have sex or perform sexual acts you’re not comfortable with.
  • Pressuring you to use drugs or alcohol.
  • Intimidating you through threatening looks or actions.
  • Insulting your parenting or threatening to harm or take away your children or pets.
  • Intimidating you with weapons like guns, knives, bats, or mace.
  • Destroying your belongings or your home.

Know the Warning Signs of Child Abuse and Neglect

  • Child abuse and neglect is any harm to a child that is not an accident.
  • Child abuse and neglect are also called child maltreatment.
  • Neglect is when parents or caregivers fail to ensure a child’s health and well-being.
  • Neglect may result from not providing a child with appropriate shelter, schooling, clothing, medical care, or protection from hazards.
  • Physical abuse causes bodily injuries, such as bruises, burns, fractures, cuts, punctures, or organ damage.
  • Physical abuse includes harming a fetus, such as when a pregnant woman has substance use disorder or is purposefully injured.
  • Emotional (psychological) abuse is a repeated pattern of intentional verbal or behavioral actions or lack of actions toward a child that give the message that he or she is worthless, flawed, unloved, unwanted, endangered, or only of value to meet someone else’s needs.
  • Withholding emotional support, isolating, or terrorizing a child are forms of emotional abuse.
  • Intimate partner (domestic) violence that is witnessed by a child is also considered a form of emotional abuse.
  • Sexual abuse is any act with a child that is intended to sexually gratify an older child or adult. It includes any sexual activity that a child does not comprehend or consent to, or that is against the law. Exhibitionism, voyeurism, and exposing a child to pornography are also types of sexual abuse.
  • You suspect child abuse. Call your local child or adult protective agency, police, or a health professional, such as a doctor, nurse, or counselor.

What should you do if you’re being abused?

  • It’s important to get help. Talk with someone you trust, such as a friend, a help center, or your doctor. Talking with someone can help you make the changes you need.
  • Your first step is to contact a local advocacy group for support, information, and advice on how to stay safe. Call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (1-800-799-7233) for the nearest program. The hotline is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, in English, Spanish, and other languages.
  • You can also see the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence website at https://ncadv.org/resources to find programs that offer shelter and legal support.
  • Know your legal rights. Consider asking the police for help.
  • Make sure that you know phone numbers you can call and places you can go in an emergency.
  • Teach your children not to get in the middle of a fight.
  • If you think you may leave, make a plan to help keep you safe. This will help when you are getting ready to leave. Your plan might include:
  • Putting together and hiding a suitcase of clothing, copies of your car and house keys, money or credit cards, and important papers, such as Social Security cards and birth certificates for you and your children. Keep the suitcase hidden in your home or leave it with friends or family or at work if possible.
  • Open a savings account or get a credit card, if you can do so in secret.
  • If you are a teen, talk to a trusted adult, such as your parents, family friend, or school counselor. You can also call the National Teen Dating Abuse Hotline toll-free: 1-866-331-9474.

What should you do if you know someone who is being abused?

  • Be a good listener and a caring friend.
  • Remind the person that no one deserves to be treated this way.
  • Let the person know that the abuse is against the law and that help is available.
  • Help the person make a plan to stay safe.
  • You can also suggest that the person call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (1-800-799-7233) to find a local domestic violence support group.
  • Keep in mind that the person may not want or be ready to leave. He or she probably knows the abuser best and knows what options are safest. But it is important for victims of abuse to know where they can get help.

Why do victims stay?

People who are not abused might find it hard to understand why anyone would stay in a violent relationship. Some people think that if a person stays in an abusive relationship, she or he must be weak or needy. This is not true. There is more to this issue than simply leaving or staying. A woman may fear that the abuser will hurt her and her children or take her children away. She may have limited financial options. She may blame herself. She may stay for religious reasons or because she does not want to break up the family. Also, she may still love her abuser and hope that things will get better. The abuser may threaten self-harm or suicide. Men who are being abused may have similar feelings.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

Join Us for Our Annual Meeting: “Removing Barriers”

Community Health Net Annual MeetingCommunity Health Net Annual Meeting: “Removing Barriers”

Community Health Net will hold its annual meeting on Friday, October 22, 2021.  The theme is “Removing Barriers,” presented by guest speaker James W. Grunke, President and CEO of the Erie Regional Chamber. The program will begin at noon. Tickets are $30 per reservation or $150 per table.  For more information, contact Mary Lynn Slivinski at mslivinski@community-healthnet.com or (814) 454-4530, ext. 227.

About the Speaker

James W. Grunke has more than 30 years of experience in economic development leadership, with key roles at a number of economic development organizations. During his 6-year tenure at the Missoula Economic Partnership in Missoula, Mont., the community gained 10,000 new jobs while attracting nearly $1 billion in capital investment. The partnership assisted more than 100 new start-up companies and helped attract more than 30 companies that relocated from other areas. Grunke holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Public Policy degrees from Boise State University. He also is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma Economic Development Institute – widely regarded as the nation’s premier economic development educational program – and the Northwest Community Development Institute, an intensive three-year training program for economic development professionals, community leaders, and elected officials.

September is National Aging Awareness Month!

National Aging® Awareness Month focuses on practical ways for adults, ages 45-plus, to improve their physical and mental well-being and take control of their health!

 

Get the Facts

  • Falls are very common in older adults. Many falls cause only minor injuries, but some can be life-changing and cause older adults to restrict their activities.
  • Memory concerns often cause anxiety for older adults and families. They may — or may not — reflect substantial decreases in thinking abilities.
  • Although healthy older adults have lower rates of depression than the general public, depression is still a common problem that is easily missed. It’s more common in those who are struggling with illness, involved in caregiving, or socially isolated.
  • About 50% of all adults aged 65+ experience bothersome pain every month, often in multiple parts of the body. Persisting pain is linked with decreased social and physical activity, depression, and taking worse care of one’s own health. Pain can also be a sign of a new health problem that needs attention or a chronic problem that’s being poorly managed.
  • Both isolation (not having a lot of social contact with others) and loneliness (the feeling of lacking social connection) have been linked to declines in physical health. A 2012 study found that 43% of older adults reported feeling lonely; over the next 6 years, they were more likely to lose physical abilities or die. Loneliness and isolation have also been linked to decreased immune function and a greater risk of depression.
  • Polypharmacy means taking multiple medications. It’s a problem mainly because as people get older, they become especially at risk for harm from medication side-effects or interactions.
  • According to the CDC, every year 177,000 older adults visit the emergency room due to medication problems.

Take Action.

  • Exercise can be as simple as walking just ten or fifteen minutes, three to four times a week, and increasing as you go.
  • For those who are more active, try taking up tennis or joining a club where you can swim or use the exercise equipment.  Even just taking a dance class or senior yoga, gardening, or mowing the lawn.
  • Consider proper portion sizes when eating.  Eating larger portions than recommended leads to obesity, diabetes, and/or heart disease.
  • Keeping your mind active and engaged may ward changes that could lead to Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Be pos­i­tive in your con­ver­sa­tions and your actions every day.
  • Stay Social. Don’t be afraid to make new friends, and make an effort to see your old friends, too. A sedentary lifestyle devoid of interaction with friends and family leads to health issues and isolation can lead to depression.
  • Maintain regularly scheduled visits to your healthcare provider.
  • If you feel pains or symptoms, do not ignore them.  See your provider immediately.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

10 Facts You Should Know about Girard School-Based Health Center

Fact #1: 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 is a doctor’s office inside of your child’s school, staffed with a primary care provider and clinical staff from 8 am to 5 pm each week throughout the school year. Services are provided through 𝗖𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗡𝗲𝘁. The SBHC was established to supplement the care children already receive, reach children who may not have access to care, and decrease absenteeism.

Fact #2: 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 is located at Girard High School.

Fact #3: Any student with a signed consent form that attends school within the Girard School District may be seen at 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗮𝘁 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗛𝗶𝗴𝗵 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹. Our providers will also administer primary health care services to the staff of Girard School District and Girard/Lake City Community members.

Fact #4: Our primary care providers offer a variety of services through 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 𝗮𝘁 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗛𝗶𝗴𝗵 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹. These services include yearly well-child exams, vaccinations, sports physicals, acute care visits (i.e., sick visits, lacerations, injuries, etc.), chronic care visits (i.e., asthma, allergy shots, etc.), and early intervention/prevention through consistency and education.

Fact #5: 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 was formed in collaboration with Girard School District Board of Education and 𝗖𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗡𝗲𝘁 to provide care and convenience for the children and the staff of the Girard School District. Completing a consent form and registering your children in school-based health care is optional.

Fact #6: Before each visit with your child (whether previously scheduled or not), the provider at 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 will contact you by phone before that day’s visit to verify that your child may be seen. If the provider cannot reach you, they will defer to your child’s written consent form. If a written consent form is not available and the provider cannot speak with you to obtain verbal consent, your child will not be seen. Verbal permission is good for that day’s visit and may only be obtained once per school year.

Fact #7: We accept consent forms anytime throughout the school year. These are available at each location of Girard School District (Elk Valley Elementary, Rice Avenue Middle School, and Girard High School), in the main office and nurses’ offices.

Fact #8: Yes, all services provided within 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 will be billed. We accept most major insurances, including PEIA, CHIPs, Medicaid, and Blue Cross Blue Shield. If your child does not have insurance, they can still be seen at the SBHC, and you will be billed directly for the cost of the services.

Fact #9: If your child is uninsured, please contact 𝗖𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗡𝗲𝘁 at (814) 454-4530 for assistance in enrolling in an insurance plan or the CHN 𝗦𝗹𝗶𝗱𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗙𝗲𝗲 𝗗𝗶𝘀𝗰𝗼𝘂𝗻𝘁 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗴𝗿𝗮𝗺. The Sliding Fee Discount Program reduces the cost of care to uninsured patients based on their family size and income.

Fact #10: 𝗚𝗶𝗿𝗮𝗿𝗱 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗼𝗼𝗹 𝗕𝗮𝘀𝗲𝗱 𝗛𝗲𝗮𝗹𝘁𝗵 𝗖𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗿 is funded by Community Health Net and staffed by a primary care provider and a clinical team.

Community Health Net Shares in White House Mask Initiative

The government is distributing 25 million masks to health centers and pantries.

 

For Immediate Release

Erie, Pa. – August 16, 2021 – Community Health Net (CHN), the leading Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) serving the Lake Erie region, has announced that it has received a supply of 1000 youth masks under a new White House mask initiative. Through the National Strategy to defeat COVID-19, the Administration is delivering more than 25 million facemasks to over 1,300 Community Health Centers across the country and 60,000 food pantries and soup kitchens, reaching some of the nation’s most vulnerable populations. Led by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Department of Defense (DoD), the purpose of the effort is to ensure that low-income individuals have affordable access to this essential protection.

“The safety and health of individuals and families in the Lake Erie region is top of mind for us, especially those who can be adversely impacted by COVID-19 due to their economic status,” said Craig Ulmer, CEO of Community Health Net.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends mask-wearing as a critical step to slow the spread and protect people from getting COVID-19. However, many low-income Americans still lack access to this protection. Two-thirds of the people served by Community Health Centers nationally live in poverty, 60% are racial and/or ethnic minorities, and nearly 1.4 million are unhoused.   “We are excited to be included in this special initiative as it integrates perfectly into our ongoing regional COVID-19 mitigation efforts.”

Residents in the region may pick up an individually wrapped package of two masks for each person in their household at any CHN location.  Child sizes are available. The masks are 3-ply, high-quality, washable, and consistent with the mask guidance from the CDC.  The distribution will not impact mask availability for health care workers.

About Community Health Net

Community Health Net is the preeminent, community-focused healthcare network that advances the wellness of the region. Our mission is to improve our region’s quality of life by providing professional healthcare services with compassion, respect, and dignity to all. We are a Federally Qualified Health Center with seven locations serving the Lake Erie region for over 35 years.

Acknowledgment

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), in partnership with the Department of Defense (DoD).  For more information, please visit WhiteHouse.gov.

 

 

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