Category: Health Facts

September is Newborn Screening Awareness Month

Protecting your child from potentially treatable diseases is vital if you are expecting parents or new parents. Newborn screening identifies conditions that can affect a child’s long-term health or survival.

Get the Facts

Newborn screening is a public health program that tests spots of blood from all newborns for certain conditions that are not noticeable at the time of birth but can cause serious disability or even death if not treated quickly.

Infants that develop conditions may seem perfectly healthy and frequently come from families with no previous history of a condition.

Early detection, diagnosis, and intervention can prevent death or disability and enable children to reach their full potential.

Each year, millions of babies in the U.S. are routinely screened, using a few drops of blood from the newborn’s heel

Babies are screened for certain genetic, endocrine, and metabolic disorders, and are also tested for hearing loss and critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs) prior to discharge from a hospital or birthing center.

The National Institutes of Health states, “Using a few drops of blood, newborn screening detects a treatable condition in about 1 in 300 babies born each year, a total of about 12,500 cases each year.”

Take Action

Screening occurs within the first 24 to 48 hours after delivery. A “heel stick” provides blood drops that are collected on sterile, absorbent filter paper.

Most states also include a hearing test in newborn screening.

Many states measure the amount of oxygen in a baby’s blood to identify infants who need to see a heart specialist immediately.

Some states require a second blood test to ensure accuracy when an infant is ten days to 2 weeks old.

When you are thinking about getting a screening test, talk with your health care provider.

Find out what the test is like and how the test may help your child.

Ask what further testing and follow-up will be needed if a screening test result shows a possible problem.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or click here to contact us.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

Children are exposed to thousands of germs every day. On-time immunizations help provide immunity against potentially life-threatening diseases before children are exposed to them.


August is National Immunization Awareness Month. This annual observance highlights the importance of getting recommended immunizations. Making sure that your child sees their doctor for well-child visits and recommended immunizations is one of the best things you can do to protect your child and community from serious diseases that are easily spread.  Many children missed check-ups and recommended childhood vaccinations during the past two years. CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend children catch up on routine childhood immunizations following disruptions from COVID-19.

Get the Facts

  • Children who are not protected by vaccines are more likely to get diseases like measles and whooping cough.
  • Diseases are extremely contagious and can be very serious, especially for babies and young children.
  • In recent years, there have been outbreaks of diseases, especially in communities with low vaccination rates.
  • The national immunization coverage among kindergarten children during the 2020-2021 school year dropped by about 1% from the previous year— that amounts to 35,000 more children without immunization documents.

Read: Diseases & the Vaccines that Prevent Them

Take Action

  • Work with your child’s doctor or nurse to make sure they get caught up on missed well-child visits and recommended immunizations.
  • If you are pregnant, talk to your prenatal care provider about recommended immunizations.
  • All pregnant people are recommended to get a whooping cough shot (Tdap) during the 27th through 36th week of each pregnancy. Getting a Tdap vaccine during pregnancy provides the best protection against whooping cough for you and your baby in the first few months of life before your baby is old enough to get their own whooping cough shots.
  • A flu shot during any trimester of each pregnancy provides the best protection against flu for you and can also protect your baby for the first several months after birth when they are too young to be immunized.
  • Talk to your child’s doctor or nurse about any routine shots your child may have missed.
  • The immunization schedule is designed to provide immunity (protection) early in life before children are likely to be exposed to serious, potentially life-threatening diseases.

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

 

June is National Men’s Health Month

Most of the factors that contribute to men’s shorter lives are preventable. This month let’s encourage early detection and treatment among men!

Get the Facts.

  • Nearly three-quarters of men prefer to scrub the toilet or do other chores than see a doctor for preventive care, such as annual checkups.
  • The leading causes of death for men in the United States are heart disease, cancer, and accidents.
  • Men are less likely to recognize and seek help for depression.
  • As a male, you are more likely to get type 2 diabetes at a lower weight than women.
  • One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime.

Take Action

  • Get regular check-ups, and don’t be afraid to talk to your doctor about the uncomfortable stuff.
  • If you have chest pain, lightheadedness, back pain, or arm pain, go to the doctor.
  • Talk to your doctor about how often you should get a prostate exam.
  • Regular exercise and healthy eating can help prevent diabetes.

Symptoms of Depression

  • Feeling withdrawn.
  • Acting aggressive, irritable, and hostile.
  • Depression can also be seen in physical symptoms such as a racing heart, headaches, tightening chest, and digestive issues.
  • Deal with feelings by drinking, abusing drugs, or pursuing risky behavior.

In many cultures, it isn’t okay for men to be depressed because it is seen as “feminine.” But that isn’t true. Depression is a real problem that can affect any sex. Depression affects men in different ways than women. Having depression is nothing to be ashamed of. Talk to your doctor or trusted friend about how you have been feeling. If it is an emergency, do not hesitate to call 800-273-8255 or go to suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

Mental health is a huge part of overall health and should be a priority for everyone.

Each year, millions of people in the U.S. face the reality of living with a mental health condition.

Get the Facts

A mental illness is a condition that affects a person’s thinking, feeling, or mood. Such conditions may affect someone’s ability to relate to others and function each day. Each person will have different experiences, even people with the same diagnosis.

A mental health condition isn’t the result of one event. Research suggests multiple, linking causes. Genetics, environment, and lifestyle influence whether someone develops a mental health condition. A stressful job or home life makes some people more susceptible, as do traumatic life events. Biochemical processes and circuits and basic brain structure may play a role, too.

Mental health conditions are far more common than you think, mainly because people don’t like to, or are scared to, talk about them.

  • 1 in 5 U.S. adults experiences mental illness each year.
  • 1 in 20 U.S. adults experiences serious mental illness each year.
  • 1 in 6 U.S. youth aged 6-17 experience a mental health disorder each year.
  • 50% of all lifetime mental illness begins by age 14, and 75% by age 24.

Symptoms may include:

  • Excessive worrying or fear.
  • Feeling excessively sad or low.
  • Confused thinking or problems concentrating and learning..
    Extreme mood changes, including uncontrollable “highs” or feelings of euphoria.
  • Prolonged or strong feelings of irritability or anger.
  • Avoiding friends and social activities.
  • Difficulties understanding or relating to other people.
  • Changes in sleeping habits or feeling tired and low energy.
  • Changes in eating habits such as increased hunger or lack of appetite.
  • Changes in sex drive.
  • Difficulty perceiving reality (delusions or hallucinations, in which a person experiences and senses things that don’t exist in objective reality).
  • Inability to perceive changes in one’s own feelings, behavior or personality (”lack of insight” or anosognosia).
  • Overuse of substances like alcohol or drugs.
  • Multiple physical ailments without obvious causes (such as headaches, stomach aches, vague and ongoing “aches and pains”)
    Thinking about suicide.
  • Inability to carry out daily activities or handle daily problems and stress.
  • An intense fear of weight gain or concern with appearance.

Take Action

If you or someone you know needs help now, you should immediately call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or call 911.

If you are thinking of harming yourself or others, or are having thoughts of suicide, don’t be afraid to speak openly and honestly if you need help. You are not alone and there is support available.

Mental illness is not your fault or that of the people around you.

Don’t be afraid to reach out if you or someone you know needs help. Learning all you can about mental health is an important first step.

It’s crucial that you advocate for your own health so you can receive the best care possible.

Unlike diabetes or cancer, there is no medical test that can accurately diagnose mental illness. A mental health professional will assess symptoms and make a diagnosis.

After diagnosis, a health care provider can help develop a treatment plan that could include medication, therapy, or other lifestyle changes.

When people are directly involved in designing their own treatment plan, including defining recovery and wellness goals, choosing services that support them, and evaluating treatment decisions and progress, the experience of care and outcomes are improved.

Find a Doctor

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

April is National Autism Awareness Month

Autism Awareness activities increase the knowledge of Autism and impart information about the importance of early diagnosis and early intervention.

What is Autism?

Autism is a complex brain disorder that often inhibits a person’s ability to communicate, respond to surroundings, and form relationships with others. Also called autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Autism refers to a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech, and nonverbal communication. ASD now includes conditions that used to be diagnosed separately. These include Autism, Asperger’s syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder, and childhood disintegrative disorder.

Get the Facts

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control, Autism affects an estimated 1 in 44 children in the United States today.
  • Symptoms usually are noticed by the time a child is two years old.
  • The exact cause of ASD is not known.
  • ASD tends to run in families and occurs more often in people with certain genetic conditions such as fragile X syndrome and tuberous sclerosis.
  • The risk of having a baby with ASD is higher if the birth parent is older, has another child who has Autism or has a family history of learning problems.
  • Each person with Autism has a distinct set of strengths and challenges, as ASD can range from mild to severe.
  • Some people with ASD may require significant support in their daily lives. In contrast, others may need less help and, in some cases, live entirely independently.
    Others may develop social and verbal skills and lead independent lives as adults.

Take Action

  • Learn more about the symptoms and treatment options for Autism.
  • Educate yourself about ASD. Learning all you can about ASD can help you know how to help your child develop independence.
  • Diagnosing ASD involves a combination of screening questions, assessments, and evaluation of the way a child behaves and interacts with others.
  • As a parent, you know your child best and are their best advocate. If you are concerned, share your observations with your doctor.
  • Well-child visits are essential, as screening questions are usually asked at the 18-month and 24-month timeframe.
  • Treating ASD early gives you the tools and support to help your child lead the best life possible.
  • An essential part of your child’s treatment plan is to make sure that other family members get training about ASD and how to help manage symptoms.
  • Like any other child, your child has strengths and weaknesses. Help build on their strengths by encouraging your child to explore interests at home and in school.
  • Plan breaks. The daily demands of caring for a child with ASD can take their toll. Planned breaks will help you connect with others in your family or have time for yourself. Make time for an activity you enjoy, even if you can only do it for a few minutes each day.
  • Get extra help when your child gets older. The teen years can be a challenging time for children with ASD.
  • Reach out to other families who have children with ASD to talk about your problems and share advice with people who will understand.
  • Plan for your child’s future. Take steps to ensure that your adult child will have proper care and resources throughout life..

Find a Doctor

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.


Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.


 

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States.

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Colorectal cancer means that cells that aren’t normal are growing in your colon or rectum. These cells grow together and form polyps. Over time, some polyps can turn into cancer.

This cancer is also called colon cancer or rectal cancer, depending on where the cancer is. And it occurs most often in people older than 50.

Get the Facts.

  • The lifetime risk of developing colon cancer is about 1 in 23 for men and women combined but varies widely according to individual risk factors.
  • About 71% of cases arise in the colon and about 29% in the rectum.
  • The proportion of cases diagnosed in individuals younger than age 50 increased from 6% in 1990 to 11% in 2013.
  • Most of these cases (72%) occur in people who are in their 40s.

Take Action.

  • Talk to your doctor immediately, regardless of your age or family history, if you are experiencing symptoms such as pain, blood, or other irregularities.
  • All men and women should be screened for colorectal cancer.
  • Adults without a family history should begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45.
  • If you have a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, get screened at age 40 or 10 years before the age of the youngest case in your immediate family.

Symptoms

Colorectal cancer usually doesn’t cause symptoms until after it has started to spread. See your doctor if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Pain in your belly
  • Blood in your stool or very dark stools
  • A change in your bowel habits, such as more frequent stools or a feeling that your bowels are not emptying completely

Screening

Screening tests can find or prevent many cases of colon and rectal cancer. They look for a certain disease or condition before any symptoms appear. Some experts say that adults should start regular screening at age 50 and stop at age 75. Others say to start before age 50 or continue after age 75. Talk with your doctor about your risk and when to start and stop screening. Your doctor may recommend getting tested more often or at a younger age if you have a higher risk.

Screening tests include stool tests, such as FIT, that can be done at home and procedures, such as colonoscopy, that are done at your doctor’s office or clinic.

Find a Doctor

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

February is Children’s Dental Awareness Month

Developing good oral health habits at an early age and visiting the dentist regularly helps children get a great start on a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums!

Get the Facts

  • Cavities (also known as caries or tooth decay) are one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood in the United States.
  • Untreated cavities can cause pain and infections that may lead to problems with eating, speaking, playing, and learning.
  • According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, more than 50 percent of children will be affected by tooth decay before age five.
  • Children who have poor oral health often miss more school and receive lower grades than children who don’t. According to the Office of the Surgeon General, more than 51 million school hours are lost each year to dental-related conditions.
  • According to the American Dental Hygienists Association, every dollar spent on preventative dental care could save you $8 to $50 in restorative and emergency dental treatments and potentially more in additional types of medical treatment.
  • About 1 of 5 (20%) children aged 5 to 11 years have at least one untreated decayed tooth.
  • 1 of 7 (13%) adolescents aged 12 to 19 years have at least one untreated decayed tooth.
  • Children aged 5 to 19 years from low-income families are twice as likely (25%) to have cavities, compared with children from higher-income households (11%).1

Take Action

The good news is that cavities are preventable.

  • A child should see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth appears, or by his or her first birthday.
  • Wipe gums twice a day with a soft, clean cloth in the morning after the first feeding and right before bed to wipe away bacteria and sugars that can cause cavities.
  • When teeth come in, start brushing twice a day with a soft, small‑bristled toothbrush and plain water.
  • Help keep your child’s teeth healthy by using the 2-2-2 rule: visit your dentist two times a year, and brush and floss TWO times a day for TWO whole minutes!
  • In general, teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. If your child is racing through cleaning, try setting a timer or help them hum their favorite tune.
  • Teach your children to be gentle with their teeth. Too much pressure may damage their gums.
  • The ADA recommends changing toothbrushes every 3-4 months. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your child’s teeth clean. When you’re shopping, look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
  • Fluoride varnish can prevent about one-third (33%) of cavities in the primary (baby) teeth.
  • Children living in communities with fluoridated tap water have fewer cavities than children whose water is not fluoridated.
  • Children who brush daily with fluoride toothpaste will have fewer cavities.
  • Dental sealants can also prevent cavities for many years. Applying dental sealants to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth prevent 80% of cavities.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule your child’s dental exam today! Call (814) 456-8548.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States. People at risk for glaucoma need to know what steps they can take to help protect their vision.

Get The Facts

What is glaucoma?
Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that can cause vision loss and blindness by damaging a nerve in the back of your eye called the optic nerve. The symptoms can start so slowly that you may not notice them. Therefore, the only way to find out if you have glaucoma is to get a comprehensive dilated eye exam. There’s no cure for glaucoma, but early treatment can often stop the damage and protect your vision.

What are the types of glaucoma?
There are many different types of glaucoma, but the most common type in the United States is called open-angle glaucoma. It’s what most people mean when they talk about glaucoma. Other types are less common, like angle-closure glaucoma and congenital glaucoma.

What are the symptoms of glaucoma?
At first, glaucoma doesn’t usually have any symptoms. That’s why half of the people with glaucoma don’t even know they have it. Over time, you may slowly lose vision, usually starting with your side (peripheral) vision — especially the part of your vision that’s closest to your nose. Because it happens so slowly, many people can’t tell that their vision is changing at first. But as the disease gets worse, you may start to notice that you can’t see things off to the side anymore. Without treatment, glaucoma can eventually cause blindness.

Am I at risk for glaucoma?
Anyone can get glaucoma, but some people are at higher risk. You’re at higher risk if you:

  • Are over age 60, especially if you’re Hispanic/Latino.
  • Are African American and over age 40.
  • Have a family history of glaucoma.

Talk with your doctor about your risk for glaucoma, and ask how often you need to get checked. For example, you need to get a comprehensive dilated eye exam every 1 to 2 years if you’re at higher risk.

What causes glaucoma?

Scientists aren’t sure what causes the most common types of glaucoma. Still, many people with glaucoma have high eye pressure — and treatments that lower eye pressure helps slow the disease. But, unfortunately, there’s no way to prevent glaucoma. That’s why eye exams are so important — so you and your doctor can find it before it affects your vision.

Take Action

How will my eye doctor check for glaucoma?

Eye doctors can check for glaucoma as part of a comprehensive dilated eye exam. The exam is painless and straightforward. Your doctor will give you some eye drops to dilate (widen) your pupil and then check your eyes for glaucoma and other eye problems. The exam includes a visual field test to check your side vision.

What’s the treatment for glaucoma?
Doctors use different types of treatment for glaucoma, including medicines (usually eye drops), laser treatment, and surgery. If you have glaucoma, it’s important to start treatment right away. Treatment won’t undo any damage to your vision, but it can stop it from getting worse.

  • Medicines. Prescription eye drops are the most common treatment. They lower the pressure in your eye and prevent damage to your optic nerve.
  • Laser treatment. Doctors can use lasers to help the fluid drain out of your eye to lower your eye pressure. It’s a simple procedure that your doctor can do in the office.
  • Surgery. Your doctor might suggest surgery if medicines and laser treatment don’t work. Several different types of surgery can help the fluid drain out of your eye.

Talk over your options with your doctor. While glaucoma is a serious disease, treatment works well. Remember these tips:

  • If your doctor prescribes medicine, be sure to take it every day.
  • Tell your doctor if your treatment causes side effects.
  • See your doctor for regular check-ups.
  • If you’re having trouble with everyday activities because of your vision loss, ask your doctor about vision rehabilitation services or devices that could help.
  • Encourage family members to get checked for glaucoma since it can run in families.

Call Community Health Net to schedule your eye exam today! Call (814) 455-7222. 

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

December is National Influenza Awareness Month

The Flu is a viral infection that attacks your respiratory system. It can result in serious health complications that could lead to hospitalization and even death.  

Get the Facts

  • The Flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and – sometimes – the lungs. 
  • People with influenza can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away.  
  • People with the Flu are most contagious in the first three to four days after their illness begins.
  • The Flu is different from a cold. Unlike a cold, it usually comes on suddenly.
  • Flu viruses are spread mainly by tiny droplets made when infected people cough, sneeze or talk.
  • Flu viruses are most common during the fall and winter.

People at higher risk of developing flu complications include:

  • Young children under age 5, and especially those under six months.
  • Adults older than age 65.
  • Residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.
  • Pregnant women and women up to two weeks after giving birth.
  • People with weakened immune systems.
  • Native Americans.
  • People who have chronic illnesses, such as asthma, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, and diabetes.
  • People who are very obese, with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher.

Take Action

  • The best way to prevent the Flu is by getting a flu vaccine each year.
  • Where a mask.
  • Practice social distancing.

Call your medical provider if you have the following symptoms:

  • Fever.
  • Aching muscles.
  • Chills and sweats.
  • Headache.
  • Dry, persistent cough.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Tiredness and weakness.
  • Runny or stuffy nose.
  • Sore throat.
  • Eye pain.
  • Vomiting and diarrhea (more common in children than adults).

Seek immediate medical attention if you have the following symptoms:

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Chest pain
  • Ongoing dizziness
  • Seizures
  • Worsening of existing medical conditions
  • Severe weakness or muscle pain

Emergency signs and symptoms in children can include:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Blue lips
  • Chest pain
  • Dehydration
  • Severe muscle pain
  • Seizures
  • Worsening of existing medical condition

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule your flu shot today!  Call (814) 455-7222. 

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

 

November is COPD Awareness Month

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) affects millions of Americans. It is the third leading cause of disease-related death in the U.S. The good news is that COPD is often preventable and treatable. If you or a loved one has COPD, there are steps to take to cope with the lifestyle changes this disease brings.

Get the Facts

  • COPD is a lung disease that makes it hard to breathe.
  • COPD is almost always caused by smoking.
  • COPD gets worse over time. You cannot undo the damage to your lungs.
  • Many people don’t recognize the symptoms of COPD until the later stages of the disease.
  • Some think they are short of breath or less able to go about their normal activities because they are “just getting older.”
  • COPD is most common in people who are older than 60.
  • People who have COPD are more likely to get lung infections.

Take Action

If you experience any of the following symptoms or think you might be at risk for COPD, it is essential to discuss this with your doctor:

  • Chronic cough.
  • Shortness of breath while doing everyday activities (dyspnea).
  • Frequent respiratory infections.
  • Blueness of the lips or fingernail beds (cyanosis).
  • Fatigue.
  • Producing a lot of mucus (also called phlegm or sputum).
  • Wheezing.

The best way to slow COPD is to quit smoking. It is never too late to quit. No matter how long you have smoked or how severe your COPD is, quitting smoking can help stop the damage to your lungs. Also, consider the following:

  • Avoid things that can irritate your lungs, such as smoke and air pollution.
  • Use an air filter in your home.
  • Get regular exercise to stay as strong as you can.
  • Eat well so you can keep up your strength.
  • Maintain good mental health.

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

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