Category: Health Facts

Heart Health and Cardiovascular Disease: Keeping Your Heart Healthy

Having a healthy heart is super important if you want to live a long and happy life. We’re going to talk about heart disease, what makes it more likely to happen, and how you can keep your heart feeling great.

What’s Heart Disease Anyway?

Heart disease is a name for when there’s something wrong with your heart or blood vessels. This can mean a bunch of different problems like clogged arteries, heart attacks, strokes, or when your heart can’t pump as well as it should. Sadly, it’s the number one reason why people around the world die. But the good news is, there are ways to stop it from happening to you.

Things That Make Heart Disease More Likely

There are some things that make heart disease more likely, and while you can’t change some of them (like getting older or your family’s health history), there are plenty you can do something about:

High Blood Pressure: This means your heart and blood vessels are working too hard. It can make heart disease more likely.

High Cholesterol: Too much cholesterol can clog your arteries, making it tough for blood to get to your heart.

Smoking: Smoking is really bad for your blood vessels and makes heart problems more likely.

Diabetes: If you have diabetes, your blood sugar levels can harm your blood vessels over time, leading to heart issues.

How to Keep Your Heart Happy

Good news! There are lots of ways to keep your heart in great shape:

Exercise: Try to get moving, like walking fast, jogging, or swimming, for about 150 minutes every week. It’s good for your heart, helps control blood pressure, and keeps your weight in check.

Eat Healthy: Eating stuff like fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean meats, and healthy fats (think avocados, nuts, and olive oil) is great for your heart.

Stop Smoking: Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your heart. There are people and medicines that can help you quit.

Check-ups: See your doctor regularly to keep an eye on your blood pressure and cholesterol. Catching problems early can help stop heart disease before it starts.

Knowing about heart health and what causes heart disease is really important. If you follow these tips, you can lower your chances of getting heart disease and live a longer, healthier life. Remember, it’s never too late to start looking after your heart.

To schedule an appointment today, just dial (814) 455-7222. Our representatives will be happy to assist you. Or click here to send an email to our team.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Sources:
1. World Health Organization: Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs)https://www.who.int/health-topics/cardiovascular-diseases/#tab=

2. American Heart Association: Understanding Cardiovascular Diseasehttps://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/consumer-healthcare/what-is-cardiovascular-disease

Prioritizing Mental Health and Well-being in the New Year

 

As we start the New Year, it’s important to focus on our mental health and well-being. It is a good time to think about how we feel and what makes us happy. Taking care of our mental well-being is just as important as maintaining our physical health. In this blog post, we will learn some ways to take care of our mental health and well-being to help us have a great and successful 2024.

1. Reflect on the Past Year

The New Year is coming, it is a good time to take a moment to look back on the past year. Think about both the good times and the challenges. This reflection will help you set goals for the future and identify areas where you can promote a healthy mindset.

2. Set Realistic Goals

Setting goals that you can achieve is important for your mental health. Break your goals into smaller steps and decide when you want to finish them. This will keep you motivated and prevent you from feeling overwhelmed.

3. Practice Self-Care Regularly

Taking care of yourself is very important for your mental health. You should do things that make you feel calm and happy often. Some examples are reading a book, going for a walk, or simply taking some time to do something you enjoy.

4. Cultivate a Supportive Network

Having a strong support system can greatly improve your mental well-being. Surround yourself with people who are understanding and uplifting. This could be friends, family, or joining support groups where you can connect with like-minded individuals.

5. Focus on Mindfulness and Stress Reduction

Mindfulness means paying attention to what is happening right now. It can help you feel better and less stressed. You can practice mindfulness by doing things like breathing deeply, meditating, or doing something you enjoy. When you are mindful, you can calm your mind and body. This is good for your mental health.

6. Limit Digital Overload

Nowadays, we use a lot of technology and sometimes it can be too much. You should limit how much time you spend on screens and have some time without them.  When you are not using devices, you can focus on what is happening around you and talk to people better.

7. Practice Gratitude

Gratitude is the quality of being thankful or grateful. Being thankful is easy and good for your mind. Every day, think of things that make you happy. Writing them down or telling them to others can help you see the good in life. This can help you feel more hopeful and positive.

8. Seek Professional Help if Needed

When you feel very bad because of your thoughts and feelings, you should talk to someone who knows how to help. They can listen to you and give you advice on how to deal with hard things. Asking for help is not weak, it is brave and good for you.

 

The New Year is a good time to take care of our minds and feelings. We can look back at what we did before, make plans that we can achieve, do things that make us happy, spend time with people who help us, and find ways to calm down when we are worried. Remember, taking care of your mental health is important for a happier and healthier life.

 

To schedule an appointment today, just dial (814) 455-7222. Our representatives will be happy to assist you. Or click here to send an email to our team.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

 

Sources

American Psychiatric Association. (n.d.). 8 Steps to Making Your Mental Health A Priority in the New Year. Retrieved from https://www.psychiatry.org

National Institute of Mental Health. (n.d.). Caring for Your Mental Health. Retrieved from https://www.nimh.nih.gov

Ludden, T. (n.d.). What Is Self-Reflection and Why It Matters For Wellness. Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com

 

 

Substance Abuse Awareness: Breaking Free from Addiction Together

 

Substance abuse is a big problem that affects many different kinds of people. It is important to raise awareness and learn about the dangers and consequences of substance abuse so that we can create a healthier community. This blog was written to help provide information on drug and alcohol abuse and offer some understanding into how we can break free from addiction together.

Understanding Substance Abuse

Substance abuse is when someone uses drugs or alcohol in a harmful or excessive way. Many factors can contribute to substance abuse, such as genetics, environment, and stress. It’s important to understand why people turn to drugs and alcohol in order to find effective solutions and prevent addiction.

The Consequences of Substance Abuse

Substance abuse can have serious effects on a person’s physical and mental health, as well as their overall well-being. It can lead to addiction, which is when someone becomes dependent on a substance and has a tough time stopping. This can cause damage to the brain and organs, such as the heart and liver, as well as problems with thinking and even death. Substance abuse also affects relationships, finances, and can lead to legal problems.

Prevention and Intervention

Preventing substance abuse and intervening early can make a big difference. Educating young people about the dangers of drugs and alcohol, as well as promoting healthy ways to cope with stress and problems, can help reduce the risk of addiction. Programs in schools, involving parents, and having community support networks are effective ways to prevent substance abuse.

Treatment and Recovery

For those struggling with substance abuse, getting the right treatment and support is crucial. Rehabilitation programs, counseling, and support groups can provide help for individuals to recover. It’s important to remove the stigma around addiction and offer understanding and support to those who are seeking help. Through compassion, care, and access to resources, individuals can find hope and begin the journey toward recovery.

Using drugs in the wrong way is a big issue. If we help people understand more about this problem, stop it before it starts, and give help and tools early on, we can support those who are struggling to stop using drugs. Together, we have the power to build a healthier and drug-free future.

 

To schedule an appointment today, just dial (814) 455-7222. Our representatives will be happy to assist you. Or click here to send an email to our team.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

 

Sources:

1. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2021). Drug Misuse and Addiction: Understanding Drug Use and Addiction. Retrieved from https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/understanding-drug-use-addiction

2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2019). Key Substance Use and Mental Health Indicators in the United States: Results from the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Retrieved from https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/cbhsq-reports/NSDUHNationalFindingsReport2018/NSDUHNationalFindingsReport2018.pdf

3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021). Substance Use and Overdose Prevention. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/prevention/index.html

5 Essential Dental Hygiene Tips for a Healthy Smile

 

 

 

As we step into October, it’s time to focus on dental hygiene awareness. Maintaining proper oral care not only ensures a healthy smile but also contributes to overall well-being. In this blog post, we’ll explore five essential dental hygiene tips that can help you maintain a healthy and radiant smile.

Essential Dental Hygiene Tips for a Radiant Smile

1. Brush your teeth twice a day:
Brushing your teeth twice a day is the foundation of dental hygiene. This should be done for at least two minutes each time, ensuring you reach all areas of your mouth. Invest in a soft-bristled toothbrush and a fluoride toothpaste to effectively remove plaque and bacteria, reducing the risk of tooth decay and gum disease.

2. Floss daily:
In addition to brushing, flossing plays a crucial role in dental hygiene. Flossing removes plaque and food particles stuck between the teeth and along the gum line. It helps prevent gum disease, cavities, and bad breath. Incorporate this habit into your daily routine to maintain optimal oral health.

3. Use mouthwash:
Adding mouthwash to your dental routine further enhances dental hygiene. Mouthwash helps kill bacteria, freshens breath, and strengthens teeth. Choose a mouthwash that contains fluoride to provide an added layer of protection against cavities. Remember to swish the mouthwash around for 30 seconds, ensuring it reaches all areas of your mouth, before spitting it out.

4. Maintain a balanced diet:
A healthy diet not only benefits your overall well-being but also contributes to good dental hygiene. Limit your consumption of sugary and acidic foods, as they can erode tooth enamel and lead to cavities. Instead, opt for a well-balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins. Drinking plenty of water throughout the day also helps keep your mouth moist and washes away food particles and bacteria.

5. Visit your dentist regularly:
Regular dental check-ups are crucial for maintaining optimal dental hygiene. Dentists can identify any dental issues in their early stages and provide appropriate treatment, preventing them from worsening. Aim to visit your dentist every six months for a thorough cleaning and examination. Your dentist will also advise on proper brushing and flossing techniques tailored to your specific needs.

Additional Tips:

– Replace your toothbrush every 3-4 months or sooner if the bristles become frayed. A worn-out toothbrush is less effective at removing plaque and bacteria.

– Avoid tobacco products, as they can stain your teeth and increase the risk of gum disease and oral cancer. Seek resources and support to quit if you’re a tobacco user.

– Protect your teeth during physical activities and sports by wearing a mouthguard. This helps prevent injuries to your teeth, lips, and tongue.

– Teach children about good dental hygiene habits from an early age. Encourage them to develop a routine of brushing, flossing, and visiting the dentist regularly. Make dental care fun by using colorful toothbrushes, playing educational videos, and rewarding good habits.

Conclusion:
Maintaining proper dental hygiene is essential for achieving a healthy and radiant smile. By following these five essential tips – brushing twice a day, flossing daily, using mouthwash, maintaining a balanced diet, and visiting your dentist regularly – you can ensure your teeth and gums are in the best possible condition. Take care of your oral health and enjoy the benefits of a beautiful smile.

To schedule an appointment today, just dial (814) 455-7222. Our representatives will be happy to assist you. Or, click here to send an email to our team.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

 

Sources:

1. American Dental Association (ADA). (n.d.). Brushing Your Teeth. Retrieved from https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/b/brushing-your-teeth

3. American Dental Association (ADA). (n.d.). Mouthwash. Retrieved from https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/m/mouthwash

4. American Dental Association (ADA). (n.d.). Mouthguards. Retrieved from https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/m/mouthguards

September is Sickle Cell Awareness Month

 

Get the Facts

Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) is a blood disorder passed down from parents that mainly affects people with African, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, and South Asian backgrounds. It makes the red blood cells, which carry oxygen, become a weird shape and stiff. The most common kind of SCD is called sickle cell anemia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says about 100,000 Americans have SCD. Around one in 365 African American babies are born with it. SCD can cause really bad pain, hurt your organs, and lead to other health problems, making life tough for those who have it.

Sickle cell anemia is a lifelong condition, and there’s no cure for it right now. It happens because of a change in the gene that makes a part of the blood called hemoglobin. This change leads to making a strange hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. When red blood cells with hemoglobin S release oxygen, they get stiff and turn into a sickle shape. These sickle-shaped cells tend to get stuck in small blood vessels, which causes blockages and less blood flow. This brings pain, hurts organs, and makes it easier to get sick.

 

Take Action

If you or someone you know is affected by Sickle Cell Disease, it is essential to be informed about the condition and access available resources and support. Here are some steps you can take:

1. Seek Medical Guidance: If you suspect you have SCD or have been diagnosed with the disease, consult with a healthcare professional who specializes in hematology or genetics. They can provide personalized guidance, information, and treatment options.

2. Education and Awareness: Learn more about SCD by accessing reputable sources of information. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) provide comprehensive resources on SCD, including symptoms, treatment, and management strategies. Understanding the disease can help individuals navigate their condition and make informed decisions.

3. Find Support Organizations: Connect with local or national organizations dedicated to supporting individuals with SCD and their families. These organizations can offer valuable resources, support groups, educational materials, and assistance in navigating healthcare systems.

4. Stay Informed: Keep yourself updated about SCD and how it affects you personally. New treatments and helpful tips for managing your condition are always emerging. Your healthcare provider can share the latest insights and ways to improve your quality of life.

5. Share Your Experience: Don’t hesitate to talk about your journey with SCD with friends, family, and your healthcare team. Sharing your experiences can help others learn and provide you with valuable support. Your story can inspire and reassure those going through similar challenges, creating a strong and caring community of understanding.

Remember, knowing about Sickle Cell Disease and finding support is really important. When you learn, connect with helpful resources, and become part of a supportive community, people with SCD can get the help and understanding they need.


Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

 

Sources:

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sickle Cell Disease. (2021). Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/sicklecell/index.html

2. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Sickle Cell Disease. (2021). Retrieved from https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/sickle-cell-disease

August is National Immunization Awareness Month

 

Welcome to August, a month dedicated to raising awareness about the importance of vaccinations. National Immunization Awareness Month serves as a reminder for everyone to stay up-to-date with their immunizations and protect themselves and their communities against preventable diseases. In this blog, we will explore the facts surrounding vaccinations and the necessary actions individuals can take to ensure a healthier future.

 

Get the Facts

1. Vaccines Save Lives

Vaccines are one of the most successful public health tools ever developed. They have eradicated and controlled various diseases worldwide, saving millions of lives each year. By receiving vaccinations, we not only protect ourselves but also contribute to the greater well-being of our communities.

2. Vaccine Safety and Effectiveness

Before any vaccine is approved for public use, rigorous research and testing undergo multiple stages of scrutiny. Vaccines must meet strict safety standards set by health authorities, such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The risks associated with vaccines are minimal compared to the potential harm caused by the diseases they prevent. Immunizations have proven to be highly effective in preventing illnesses and reducing their severity.

 

Take Action

1. Schedule a Check-up

Make an appointment with your healthcare provider for a comprehensive check-up, including a discussion about any vaccines you may need. Ensure that you have received all the necessary vaccinations recommended for your age and health condition. Your healthcare provider will review your immunization history, assess your current health status, and recommend any updates or boosters.

2. Stay Informed

Keep yourself informed about the latest immunization schedules and guidelines provided by reputable sources such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Stay updated on new vaccines available and understand which vaccines are recommended for specific age groups or those with certain medical conditions.

3. Have Open Dialogues with Healthcare Providers

Engage in open conversations with your healthcare providers about vaccines. Discuss any concerns or questions you have and let them address your doubts. Healthcare professionals are the best resource for reliable information and can provide personalized advice based on your specific

August, recognized as National Immunization Awareness Month, serves as a crucial reminder for individuals to prioritize their immunizations. By getting the facts about vaccines and taking action, we can contribute to a healthier and safer community for everyone.

 


Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

 

Sources:

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Their website provides comprehensive information on vaccines, including recommended immunization schedules, vaccine safety, and common vaccine myths debunked. Visit: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/index.html

– World Health Organization (WHO): The WHO’s Immunization section offers global immunization data, guidelines, and resources. It covers topics such as vaccine research, vaccine-preventable diseases, and vaccine safety. Visit: https://www.who.int/immunization/en/

– Food and Drug Administration (FDA): The FDA’s website provides information on vaccine approvals, regulatory processes, and vaccine safety monitoring. Visit: https://www.fda.gov/vaccines-blood-biologics

July 28th is World Hepatitis Day

 

World Hepatitis Day is just around the corner, and it’s time to raise our voices and shine a spotlight on this silent global epidemic. On July 28th, individuals, organizations, and communities all over the world come together to educate and advocate for the prevention and treatment of viral hepatitis. As we join forces to combat this mighty foe, let’s unveil its secrets and take action to protect ourselves and our loved ones.

Viral hepatitis, an inflammation of the liver caused by a viral infection, affects millions of people worldwide. But what makes this disease truly menacing is its stealthy nature. Often, you may not even realize you have it until severe complications arise. That’s why raising awareness is key to fighting back.

 

 

Get The Facts

Here are some important facts about hepatitis that you need to know:

1. Types: Hepatitis comes in five forms – A, B, C, D, and E. Each type has its own causes, modes of transmission, and varying levels of severity.

2. Prevention: Hepatitis A and B can be prevented through vaccination, while hepatitis C can be prevented by avoiding exposure to infected blood and practicing safe injection practices.

3. Testing: Regular screenings and tests are crucial in detecting hepatitis at early stages. Talk to your healthcare provider to determine if you should undergo hepatitis testing and to learn about available screening options.

4. Stigma: Unfortunately, hepatitis still carries a heavy burden of stigma and discrimination. By educating ourselves and others, we can combat this prejudice and create a more supportive environment for those affected by the disease.

5. Treatment and Support: The good news is that hepatitis is a preventable and treatable disease. With appropriate medical care, many individuals can live healthy lives. Seek medical attention if you suspect you may have contracted hepatitis, and don’t hesitate to reach out to support groups and organizations for guidance and resources.

 

Take Action

Now that you’re armed with knowledge, how can you actively participate in World Hepatitis Day? Here are a few ideas:

1. Spread the Word: Utilize your social media platforms, newsletters, and community networks to raise awareness about World Hepatitis Day. Share informative content, personal stories, and reliable sources to educate others.

2. Get Tested: If you haven’t already been tested for hepatitis, use this occasion as a reminder to check your status. Encourage family, friends, and colleagues to do the same.

3. Educate Others: Participate in educational events within your community. Spread awareness about hepatitis and its prevention.

4. Support Organizations: Consider donating your time, resources, or funds to organizations like CHN Community Health Net of Erie PA that work tirelessly to provide hepatitis prevention, testing, and treatment services to underserved populations.

 

Remember, every action counts, no matter how big or small. By coming together on July 28th and beyond, we can create a world where hepatitis loses its grip on our communities. Learn more about medical care for people living with Hepatitis at https://www.community-healthnet.com/programs/.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service announcement of Community Health Net.

 

Sources:

– World Health Organization. (2021). Hepatitis: Key Facts. Retrieved from https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/hepatitis-a.

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021). World Hepatitis Day. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/worldhepday.htm.

– World Hepatitis Alliance. (2021). World Hepatitis Day 2021. Retrieved from https://worldhepatitisday.org/.

– Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021). Viral Hepatitis – Statistics & Surveillance. Retrieved from https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/statistics/index.htm.

Taking Control of Your Health: National HIV Testing Day

 

In our journey toward overall well-being, we often neglect an essential aspect of self-care: our sexual health. As we focus on physical fitness, mental well-being, and healthy eating, it’s crucial to include regular HIV testing as a cornerstone of our self-care routine. National HIV Testing Day, observed on June 27th, is an opportunity to emphasize the significance of HIV testing. In this blog post, we’ll explore why HIV testing is essential and how it empowers individuals to take control of their health.

 

Self-Care: Prioritizing Health in All Aspects of Life:

At Community Health Net, we firmly believe that self-care is a fundamental component of maintaining a healthy lifestyle. While HIV testing might not be on everyone’s self-care radar, it is a vital step toward protecting oneself and others. By making HIV testing a routine part of our self-care regimen, we can ensure our overall well-being.

 

Why Get Tested for HIV?

 

1. Knowledge is Power:

Knowing your HIV status empowers you to make informed decisions about your health and take proactive measures to safeguard yourself and those you care about. Early detection of HIV leads to timely treatment and care, significantly improving health outcomes and quality of life.

 

2. Breaking Down Stigma:

HIV-related stigma can act as a barrier to testing and care. By getting tested, we challenge the stigma surrounding HIV, promoting a culture of acceptance and support. Testing demonstrates that HIV is simply a medical condition that anyone can face.

 

3. Protecting Your Partners:

Getting tested for HIV is not just about your personal health; it’s also about protecting your sexual partners. By knowing your HIV status, you can engage in open and honest conversations about sexual health with your partners, making informed decisions together and taking steps to prevent transmission.

 

4. Early Intervention is Key:

HIV is a treatable condition, especially when detected early. With advancements in medical science, individuals living with HIV can lead long, fulfilling lives with proper care and treatment. By getting tested, you open doors to timely interventions, ensuring access to necessary medical care and support.

 

On National HIV Testing Day, we invite you to join us in prioritizing your sexual health as an integral part of your self-care routine. Regardless of who you are or your station in life, HIV testing is a crucial step toward taking control of your health and well-being. By getting tested, you not only empower yourself but also contribute to breaking down stigma, protecting your partners, and ensuring early intervention if needed. Learn more about medical care for people living with HIV at https://www.community-healthnet.com/programs/.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service announcement of Community Health Net.

 

Sources:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022). National HIV Testing Day. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/awareness/testingday.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022). HIV testing. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/guidelines/index.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2022). HIV treatment. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/livingwithhiv/treatment.html

June is Men’s Health Month

 

More than 13% of U.S. men aged 18 and over are in fair or poor health. But making healthy decisions can improve the health of men and boys.

 

Get the Facts

Men in the U.S. die at higher rates from heart disease, cancer, and unintentional injuries than any other causes. And the health of racial and ethnic minority men lags behind the general population.

Experts agree that men and boys can improve their health by getting regular checkups, eating healthy, staying active, quitting smoking, and taking care of their mental health.

 

Take Action

Small changes can make a big difference. Try these today:

  • Take a walk instead of watching TV
  • Eat a green salad instead of fries
  • Drink water instead of soda or other sugary drinks
  • Call your doctor to schedule an appointment if you are overdue for one

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends more ways to improve men’s overall health:

We will protect this heart.  

  • Healthier food choices build a healthier heart. Make fruits and vegetables half of your plate.
  • Limit alcohol to one drink a day, or choose not to drink at all.
  • Cope with stress through exercise, making time to relax, and spending time with others.

Bro, you don’t even have to lift. Getting just 30 minutes of exercise each day can help you live longer and healthier.

Preventive Maintenance. See a doctor for regular checkups even if you feel healthy. Doctors can provide vaccines, and they can test for:

  • Certain cancers
  • High blood pressure or high cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • STDs (sexually transmitted diseases)
  • Mental health conditions

Quitting Time. Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, and other health problems, including risk of erectile dysfunction. If you smoke, make a plan to quit. Your doctor can help.

Hey man, you good? If you feel down, sad, or hopeless for two or more weeks, or get little pleasure from things you once enjoyed, you may be depressed. Don’t try to “tough it out.” Talk to your doctor and get the treatment you need.

Men with depression are at risk for suicide. If someone you know is in crisis, get help right away:

  • Call 988 for the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline
  • Call 911 for emergency services
  • Go to the hospital emergency room

Be #VaccineReady. Talk to your doctor to get your COVID-19 vaccines and your other shots.

Alcohol Use. Excessive alcohol can not only lead to heart disease and cancer, it can also  interfere with testicular function and male hormone production. Choose not to drink, or drink only in moderation.

For Older Men

Some healthy actions are especially important for older men.

  • Take your medications, vitamins, and supplements only as directed.
  • Call your doctor when you’re feeling sick. It can make the difference between life and death. Don’t wait.
    • Your doctor may recommend additional screenings for bone health, hearing and vision, and more.
    • Check with your doctor to get vaccinated against flu, shingles, tetanus/diphtheria, and pneumonia.
    • Tell your doctor if you have erectile dysfunction (ED), or difficulty getting or maintaining an erection. ED is common among older men, it can be treated, and it can be a warning sign of heart disease.
  • Use sunscreen year round, and wear a wide-brimmed hat.
  • Get enough calcium and vitamin D.
  • Exercise your brain. Join a book club, take a class, or do word puzzles, number puzzles, or jigsaw puzzles.
  • Do weight-bearing exercises like walking and jogging, plus weightlifting.
  • Spend time with others to stay mentally, physically and emotionally fit.

And encourage the boys and men in your life to take charge of their health!

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service announcement of Community Health Net.

 

Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2022, October 31). Excessive Alcohol Use is a Risk to Men’s Health. CDC.Gov. Retrieved May 10, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/mens-health.htm

—. (2022, October 14). Men and Heart Disease. CDC.Gov. Retrieved May 10, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/men.htm

—. National Center for Health Statistics (2023, January 18). Men’s Health. CDC.Gov. Retrieved May 10, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/mens-health.htm

—. (2022, June 6). Prostate Cancer Statistics. CDC.Gov. Retrieved May 9, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/prostate/statistics/index.htm

Health in Aging (2019, June). Tip Sheet: Good Health in Later Life for Older Men. HealthInAging.com. Retrieved May 13, 2023, from https://www.healthinaging.org/tools-and-tips/tip-sheet-good-health-later-life-older-men **

National Institute of Mental Health (2017, January). Men and Depression. Nimh.nih.gov. Retrieved May 13, 2023, from https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/men-and-depression

National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (n.d.). Brother, You’re on My Mind. Nimhd.nih.gov. Retrieved May 13, 2023, from https://www.nimhd.nih.gov/programs/edu-training/byomm/index.html

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (2022, December 22). Men: Take Charge of Your Health. Health.Gov. Retrieved May 10, 2023, from https://health.gov/myhealthfinder/doctor-visits/regular-checkups/men-take-charge-your-health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Department of Minority Health (OMH) (2022). Men’s Health Month. HHS.Gov. Retrieved May 9, 2023, from https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/mens-health/index.html

May Is Mental Health Awareness Month

 

Mental health affects how we handle stress, relate to others, and make healthy choices at every stage of life, from childhood and adolescence through adulthood. Each year in the U.S., 1 in 5 adults and 1 in 6 youth experience a mental health disorder. But for many people, recovery is possible.

 

Get the Facts

What is Mental Illness

A mental illness is a condition that affects a person’s thinking, feeling, behavior, or mood. Mental illness deeply impacts day-to-day living and may also affect the ability to relate to others.

Mental illness includes conditions such as schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), bipolar, borderline personality disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depression, anxiety, eating disorders, suicide, addiction, and others.

Mental illness can affect anyone. Half of all mental illness begins by age 14 and 75% by age 24.

 

Risk Factors

  • Genetics, environment and lifestyle, a stressful job or home life, traumatic events, biological factors in the brain, alcohol or drugs, and feelings of loneliness or isolation can all contribute to mental illness.
  • Feelings of sadness, hopelessness, and thoughts of suicide were found to be more common among students across gender, racial and ethnic groups.
  • Black students were more likely to attempt suicide than students of other races and ethnicities.
  • And people who have illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, or cancer are at higher risk for depression.

Complications

Alcohol use disorder can range from mild to severe, and even a mild disorder can lead to serious problems. Drinking too much can harm your health. Every year, excessive alcohol use is responsible for more than 140,000 deaths in the U.S. and caused 1 in every 5 deaths of U.S. adults aged 20-49 years.

Signs and Symptoms

Each mental illness has its own symptoms. Common signs of mental illness in adults and adolescents can include:

  • Excessive worrying or fear
  • Feeling very sad or low
  • Confused thinking or problems concentrating
  • Extreme mood changes
  • Avoiding friends and social activities
  • Difficulty understanding or relating to people
  • Changes in sleeping habits
  • Increased hunger or lack of appetite
  • Changes in sex drive
  • Difficulty perceiving reality
  • Overuse of alcohol or drugs
  • Multiple physical ailments without obvious causes
  • Thinking about suicide
  • Inability to do handle daily activities or stress
  • Intense fear of weight gain or concern with appearance

For children, symptoms may include:

  • Changes in school performance
  • Excessive worry
  • Hyperactive behavior
  • Frequent nightmares
  • Frequent disobedience or aggression
  • Frequent temper tantrums

Take Action

Diagnosis 
No medical test can accurately diagnose mental illness. Instead, a mental health professional will use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders to assess symptoms and make a diagnosis.

Treatment
Treatments for mental illness vary by diagnosis and by person. A health care provider can help develop a treatment plan that may include medications, therapy, psychiatric rehabilitation, and peer support.

If you feel that you sometimes drink too much alcohol, your drinking is causing problems, or if your family is concerned about your drinking, talk with your healthcare provider. Early treatment is important. Behavioral therapies, mutual-support groups, and/or medications can help people with AUD achieve and maintain recovery.

Many people can return to meaningful roles in social life, school, and work especially when they start treatment early and play a strong role in their own recovery process.

Prevention

There’s no sure way to prevent mental illness. But these practices may reduce your risk:

  • See your doctor regularly.
  • Get help when you need it.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Eat a healthy diet.
  • Do not drink alcohol, or drink in moderation.
  • Stay connected to family and friends. Talk to people you trust about how you are feeling.
  • Make time to unwind and do activities you enjoy.
  • Take breaks from the news, including on social media.

Suicide and Crisis Lifeline

“988” is the nationwide phone number to connect directly to the Suicide and Crisis Lifeline. Call or text 988 to connect with mental health professionals.

Veterans, service members, National Guard and Reserve members, and those who support them can press “1” after dialing 988 to connect to the Veterans Crisis Lifeline. For texts, Veterans should continue to text the Veterans Crisis Lifeline short code: 838255.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service announcement of Community Health Net.

 

Sources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2023, February 13). Adolescent and School Health: Mental Health. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved April 7, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/mental-health/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2022, September 14). Depression Is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved April 7, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/aging/depression/index.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2022, September 13). Mental Health. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved April 7, 2023, from https://www.cdc.gov/mentalhealth/index.htm

Mayo Clinic (2023). Mental Illness. Retrieved April 7, 2023, from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mental-illness/symptoms-causes/syc-20374968

National Alliance on Mental Illness AMI (n.d.). Mental Health Awareness Month. NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness. Retrieved April 7, 2023, from https://nami.org/Get-Involved/Awareness-Events/Mental-Health-Awareness-Month

National Alliance on Mental Illness NAMI (n.d.). About Mental Illness. NAMI National Alliance on Mental Illness. Retrieved April 7, 2023, from https://www.nami.org/About-Mental-Illness

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