Category: Cancer

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 years old or older. About 10% of all new cases in the United States are found in women younger than 45.

Get the Facts.

  • 62% of breast cancer cases are diagnosed at a localized stage, for which the 5-year survival rate is 99%
  • 1 in 8 women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime.
  • Female breast cancer represents 15.2% of all new cancer cases in the U.S.
  • Men get breast cancer too. The lifetime risk for U.S men is about 1 in 1,000.

Take Action.

  • Every person should know the symptoms and signs of breast cancer.
  • By performing breast cancer self-exams, you will be able to identify any changes in your breast easily.
  • Look for nipple tenderness, a lump or thickening in or near the breast/underarm area, a change in the skin texture, or an enlargement of pores.
  • Also, look for any unexplained change in the breast’s size or shape, dimpling, swelling, shrinkage, or recent asymmetry.

Additional Symptoms

  • The skin on the breast may dimple or look like an orange peel.
  • A change in the nipple. It may turn in. The skin around it may look scaly.
  • A fluid that comes out of the nipple.

Talk to your doctor about your risk. Find out when to start having mammograms and how often you need one. If your doctor confirms that you have a high or very high risk, ask about ways to reduce your risk, such as getting extra screening, taking medicine, or having surgery.

If you have a strong family history of breast cancer, ask your doctor about genetic testing. The test can check for gene changes that increase your risk of getting breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

Ovarian Cancer is known as the deadliest cancer in the US and causes more death than any other cancer of the female reproductive system.

Get the Facts.

Several factors may increase a women’s risk for ovarian cancer, including if you:

  • Have close family members who have had ovarian cancer.
  • Are middle-aged or older.
  • Have genetic mutation called BRCA1 pr BRCA2, or one associated with Lynch syndrome.
  • Have had breast, uterine, or colorectal (colon) cancer.
  • Have endometriosis.
  • Have never given birth or have had trouble getting pregnant.

Symptoms

  • Recent, frequent bloating.
  • Pain in the belly or pelvis.
  • Trouble eating or feeling full quickly.
  • Urinary problems, such as an urgent need to urinate or urinating more often than usual.

These symptoms may be common in women who don’t have ovarian cancer. But if these symptoms are new for you, and they happen almost daily for 2 to 3 weeks, you should see a doctor.

Take Action.

  • Stop smoking! Smoking can increase the risk of certain types of ovarian cancer.
  • Stay fit and eat healthily! Having excess body fat is linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.
  • Risks are lower for those having used birth control pills for five or more years.
  • Women who have breastfed for a year or more may have a modestly reduced risk of ovarian cancer.

Treatment

Surgery is the main treatment. The doctor will remove any tumors that he or she can see. This usually means taking out one or both ovaries. It may also mean taking out the Fallopian tubes and uterus. Chemotherapy is often part of treatment. It may be given before and after surgery.

For most women, the chances of getting this cancer are small. It most often affects women who are past menopause. You may be more likely to get it if other women in your family have had it. Also, some women inherit gene changes that increase their chances of getting it. Talking with other women who are going through the same thing may help. Your doctor or your local branch of the American Cancer Society can help you find a support group!

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc

Colon Cancer Can Kill!

Recent events have brought to light the need for all of us to be proactive about our health!  Learn more about Colon Cancer and how to protect yourself!

What is Colon Cancer?

Colon cancer means that cells that aren’t normal are growing in your colon or rectum. These cells grow together and form polyps. Over time, some polyps can turn into cancer. This cancer is also called colorectal cancer or rectal cancer, depending on where the cancer is. It is the third most common cancer in the United States. And it occurs most often in people older than 50.

What are the symptoms?

Colon cancer usually doesn’t cause symptoms until after it has started to spread. See your doctor if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Pain in your belly
  • Blood in your stool or very dark stools
  • A change in your bowel habits, such as more frequent stools or a feeling that your bowels are not emptying completely

Learn More

Learn more about how colorectal cancer is screened, diagnosed, and treated at our new health library, or schedule an appointment with a provider today at 814-455-7222.

 

Our Health Library information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist our patients to learn more about their health. Our providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Call us at (814) 455-7222