Category: News

Biggest Hearts Belong to Healthcare Heroes

Community Health Net, Erie’s largest Federally Qualified Health Center, is home to three people who define the word “heart.” They embody community, stand for dignity and respect, genuinely love people, and have given their lives to and immersed themselves in caring for individuals and families of all walks of life and socio-economic status. Alison Davis, LPN, Stephanie Schaff-Turri, RN, and Toni Gromacki, LPN, are nurses with 59 combined years of service to Erie County. They are proven, battle-hardened healthcare heroes.

“My mother was my role model. She was a pediatric nurse,” said Alison Davis, a 16-year veteran LPN. “She would always talk about her patients and how much she loved them.” When Alison told her mother about her plans to become a nurse, she replied: “If you can love people, be concerned about them, and put them ahead of yourself, then you can.” Alison has lived by those words.

Mrs. Davis is a transplant to Erie, leaving her roots in Havana, Florida, over 15 years ago, working for Community Health Net for most of her career, assisting the organization’s healthcare for the Homeless program. “CHN does not turn anyone away from good, adequate care,” she said as she expressed why she works for the organization. Mrs. Davis sees many clients that remind her of her brother, who could not care for himself after suffering a stroke and dementia. “Many of the patients in the program do not have family members who will support them. They need someone who isn’t going to judge them when they come in the door. They still deserve to be seen and cared for with respect. We need to have compassion for people.”

“Mrs. Davis sees many clients that remind her of her brother, who could not care for himself after suffering a stroke and dementia.”

Stephanie Schaff-Turri feels the same, having spent 19 years with Community Health Net and 12 years as an RN. She is an Erie native with a background in Health Science and Community Health. “We care for one patient at a time. Individualized, patient-centered care significantly impacts families and, by extension, the community,” said Mrs. Schaff-Turri. Initially, she worked to build and ensure adherence to qualified healthcare processes and procedures at CHN before becoming a nurse. “I became an RN because I felt that I would be a greater benefit to the organization by helping people.”

Stephanie often stays after work to help her patients. She also volunteers at outreach events. “I’m not in healthcare for the money. I could be a traveling nurse and make big bucks,” she noted. “What I have is a sense of accomplishment. People who you care for appreciate you years later. They will never forget you. There is a real sense of community as I help patients.”

“I became an RN because I felt that I would be a greater benefit to the organization by helping people.”

Toni Gromacki, a 29-year veteran LPN has the same sense of duty, volunteerism, and love for people. Her family roots run deep in the Erie community. “My whole family is in nursing, social work, and community shelter services. Helping people is in my blood. So, being a nurse is a comfortable fit for me,” said Mrs. Gromacki, who started her career at Community Health Net in Pediatrics. She feels as if her patients are her second family.

Toni loves her job. She works to break down barriers to health care and ensure that everyone can access care. “Patients do not come in a box. You have to listen and read between the lines to understand their needs,” said Mrs. Gromacki. “Community Health Net offers services that they [patients] would not be able to get anywhere else. Health equity and access. That is why I get up every morning to come to work.”

by DaWayne Cleckley for Community Health Net. Read the Erie Time-News / GoErie Article here: https://bit.ly/3FyfCUJ

Pennsylvania Physician General Visits Erie’s Community Health Centers

From Left to Right: Craig Ulmer, Chief Executive Officer of Community Health Net, Dr. Denise Johnson, Pennsylvania Physician General, and Patricia J. Stubber, Ph.D., MBA, Chief Executive Officer of Multi-Cultural Health Evaluation Delivery System.

On Friday, April 8th, Pennsylvania Physician General Dr. Denise Johnson visited Community Health Net and Multi-Cultural Health Evaluation Delivery System (MHEDS) to discuss equitable access to healthcare for members of Erie’s diverse underserved, refugee, and immigrant communities. Her trip included a visit to CHN’s vaccine clinic to promote a visit to promote the importance of getting fully vaccinated and boosted against COVID-19.

Community Health Net and MHEDS, Erie’s Community Health Centers, have consistently partnered on a range of health service opportunities to help ensure the health and vitality of the individuals and families in the Lake Erie Region. Community Health Net is the largest Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) serving the Lake Erie region, addressing the health of the community’s underserved. MHEDS is Erie’s primary FQHC LookAlike, primarily serving the region’s refugee, immigrant, and underserved communities.

Dr. Johnson met with Executives from Erie’s Community Health Centers, key providers within their respective organizations, and Department of Health Coordinators from communities throughout the Western Pennsylvania region. Craig Ulmer, Chief Executive Officer of Community Health Net, and Patricia J. Stubber, Ph.D., MBA, Chief Executive Officer of MHEDS, gave an in-depth presentation highlighting their respective organizations’ stalwart efforts, for-profit and non-profit community partners, and ongoing needs to affect change. A clear narrative developed through the presentation and Dr. Johnson’s follow-up questions: both health centers are undoubtedly engaged, and their work was agreeable with Pennsylvania’s Physician General.

“Community Health Net and MHEDS, Erie’s Community Health Centers, have consistently partnered on a range of health service opportunities to help ensure the health and vitality of the individuals and families in the Lake Erie Region.”

Dr. Johnson listens as Craig Ulmer and Patricia Stubber present a PowerPoint on their organizations’ collective efforts.

Both organizations provided insight into the planning for their long-term collective impact effort: Trauma-Informed Community Development, which they view as the region’s long-term answer to an engaged healthcare effort for Erie’s distressed and socially vulnerable residents. Underpinning the collaboration and other information is the Social Vulnerability Index, designed to help local officials identify communities that may need support and Strategies for Identifying and Engaging At-Risk Groups from the CDC. Factors that inform the endeavor are:

  • Socioeconomic status.
  • Household composition & disability.
  • Minority status & language.
  • Housing & transportation.

Trauma-Informed Community Development is an awareness of the impact that trauma can have in communities relative to healthcare delivery; a method of providing healthcare through a trauma-informed lens consisting of constant attention, caring awareness, and stakeholder engagement to listen to the needs of the individual. During the meeting, Dr. Johnson assisted by identifying resources that could help Erie’s Community Health Centers.

“A clear narrative developed through the presentation and Dr. Johnson’s follow-up questions: both health centers are undoubtedly engaged, and their work was agreeable with Pennsylvania’s Physician General.”

Dr. Johnson listens as Community Health Net and MHEDS providers brief her on the details of their roles in the community healthcare efforts.

Community Health Net reminded the Dr. Johnson of its designation by the Pennsylvania Department of Health as Best in Class Equity Performer for vaccinating on par or in more significant proportions with Erie County’s racial/ethnic minority populations. The conclusion affirmed Community Health Net’s efforts to distribute doses of the COVID-19 vaccine throughout the region equitably.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health invited media to attend the event to highlight the need for people to get vaccinated against COVID-19, especially since area code 16501 is the most socially vulnerable for COVID-19 transmissibility in Pennsylvania.

 

 

About Community Health Net

Community Health Net is the preeminent, community-focused healthcare network that advances the wellness of the region. Our mission is to improve our region’s quality of life by providing professional healthcare services with compassion, respect, and dignity to all. We are a Federally Qualified Health Center with seven locations serving the Lake Erie region for over 35 years.

About Multi-Cultural Health Evaluation Delivery System

Multi-Cultural Health Evaluation Delivery System, Inc. [MHEDS] is the primary community-focused healthcare system promoting the wellness of Erie’s diverse immigrant and underserved communities at its two locations in the City of Erie. MHEDS, a Federally Qualified Health Center Look-Alike, is a community-based health care provider that meets the HRSA Health Center Program requirements but does not receive Health Center Program funding. We provide primary care services in underserved areas, provide care on a sliding fee scale based on the ability to pay, and operate under a governing board that includes patients. The defining legislation for Federally Qualified Health Center Look-Alikes is Section 1905(l)(2)(B) of the Social Security Act.

 

 

 

 

April is National Autism Awareness Month

Autism Awareness activities increase the knowledge of Autism and impart information about the importance of early diagnosis and early intervention.

What is Autism?

Autism is a complex brain disorder that often inhibits a person’s ability to communicate, respond to surroundings, and form relationships with others. Also called autism spectrum disorder (ASD), Autism refers to a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech, and nonverbal communication. ASD now includes conditions that used to be diagnosed separately. These include Autism, Asperger’s syndrome, pervasive developmental disorder, and childhood disintegrative disorder.

Get the Facts

  • According to the Centers for Disease Control, Autism affects an estimated 1 in 44 children in the United States today.
  • Symptoms usually are noticed by the time a child is two years old.
  • The exact cause of ASD is not known.
  • ASD tends to run in families and occurs more often in people with certain genetic conditions such as fragile X syndrome and tuberous sclerosis.
  • The risk of having a baby with ASD is higher if the birth parent is older, has another child who has Autism or has a family history of learning problems.
  • Each person with Autism has a distinct set of strengths and challenges, as ASD can range from mild to severe.
  • Some people with ASD may require significant support in their daily lives. In contrast, others may need less help and, in some cases, live entirely independently.
    Others may develop social and verbal skills and lead independent lives as adults.

Take Action

  • Learn more about the symptoms and treatment options for Autism.
  • Educate yourself about ASD. Learning all you can about ASD can help you know how to help your child develop independence.
  • Diagnosing ASD involves a combination of screening questions, assessments, and evaluation of the way a child behaves and interacts with others.
  • As a parent, you know your child best and are their best advocate. If you are concerned, share your observations with your doctor.
  • Well-child visits are essential, as screening questions are usually asked at the 18-month and 24-month timeframe.
  • Treating ASD early gives you the tools and support to help your child lead the best life possible.
  • An essential part of your child’s treatment plan is to make sure that other family members get training about ASD and how to help manage symptoms.
  • Like any other child, your child has strengths and weaknesses. Help build on their strengths by encouraging your child to explore interests at home and in school.
  • Plan breaks. The daily demands of caring for a child with ASD can take their toll. Planned breaks will help you connect with others in your family or have time for yourself. Make time for an activity you enjoy, even if you can only do it for a few minutes each day.
  • Get extra help when your child gets older. The teen years can be a challenging time for children with ASD.
  • Reach out to other families who have children with ASD to talk about your problems and share advice with people who will understand.
  • Plan for your child’s future. Take steps to ensure that your adult child will have proper care and resources throughout life..

Find a Doctor

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.


Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.


 

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States.

What is Colorectal Cancer?

Colorectal cancer means that cells that aren’t normal are growing in your colon or rectum. These cells grow together and form polyps. Over time, some polyps can turn into cancer.

This cancer is also called colon cancer or rectal cancer, depending on where the cancer is. And it occurs most often in people older than 50.

Get the Facts.

  • The lifetime risk of developing colon cancer is about 1 in 23 for men and women combined but varies widely according to individual risk factors.
  • About 71% of cases arise in the colon and about 29% in the rectum.
  • The proportion of cases diagnosed in individuals younger than age 50 increased from 6% in 1990 to 11% in 2013.
  • Most of these cases (72%) occur in people who are in their 40s.

Take Action.

  • Talk to your doctor immediately, regardless of your age or family history, if you are experiencing symptoms such as pain, blood, or other irregularities.
  • All men and women should be screened for colorectal cancer.
  • Adults without a family history should begin colorectal cancer screening at age 45.
  • If you have a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, get screened at age 40 or 10 years before the age of the youngest case in your immediate family.

Symptoms

Colorectal cancer usually doesn’t cause symptoms until after it has started to spread. See your doctor if you have any of these symptoms:

  • Pain in your belly
  • Blood in your stool or very dark stools
  • A change in your bowel habits, such as more frequent stools or a feeling that your bowels are not emptying completely

Screening

Screening tests can find or prevent many cases of colon and rectal cancer. They look for a certain disease or condition before any symptoms appear. Some experts say that adults should start regular screening at age 50 and stop at age 75. Others say to start before age 50 or continue after age 75. Talk with your doctor about your risk and when to start and stop screening. Your doctor may recommend getting tested more often or at a younger age if you have a higher risk.

Screening tests include stool tests, such as FIT, that can be done at home and procedures, such as colonoscopy, that are done at your doctor’s office or clinic.

Find a Doctor

Call Community Health Net to schedule an appointment with a provider today: (814) 455-7222. Or visit www.communityhealthnet.org for more information.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public to learn more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

February is Children’s Dental Awareness Month

Developing good oral health habits at an early age and visiting the dentist regularly helps children get a great start on a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums!

Get the Facts

  • Cavities (also known as caries or tooth decay) are one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood in the United States.
  • Untreated cavities can cause pain and infections that may lead to problems with eating, speaking, playing, and learning.
  • According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, more than 50 percent of children will be affected by tooth decay before age five.
  • Children who have poor oral health often miss more school and receive lower grades than children who don’t. According to the Office of the Surgeon General, more than 51 million school hours are lost each year to dental-related conditions.
  • According to the American Dental Hygienists Association, every dollar spent on preventative dental care could save you $8 to $50 in restorative and emergency dental treatments and potentially more in additional types of medical treatment.
  • About 1 of 5 (20%) children aged 5 to 11 years have at least one untreated decayed tooth.
  • 1 of 7 (13%) adolescents aged 12 to 19 years have at least one untreated decayed tooth.
  • Children aged 5 to 19 years from low-income families are twice as likely (25%) to have cavities, compared with children from higher-income households (11%).1

Take Action

The good news is that cavities are preventable.

  • A child should see a pediatric dentist when their first tooth appears, or by his or her first birthday.
  • Wipe gums twice a day with a soft, clean cloth in the morning after the first feeding and right before bed to wipe away bacteria and sugars that can cause cavities.
  • When teeth come in, start brushing twice a day with a soft, small‑bristled toothbrush and plain water.
  • Help keep your child’s teeth healthy by using the 2-2-2 rule: visit your dentist two times a year, and brush and floss TWO times a day for TWO whole minutes!
  • In general, teeth should be brushed for a full two minutes, twice per day. If your child is racing through cleaning, try setting a timer or help them hum their favorite tune.
  • Teach your children to be gentle with their teeth. Too much pressure may damage their gums.
  • The ADA recommends changing toothbrushes every 3-4 months. Frayed and broken bristles won’t keep your child’s teeth clean. When you’re shopping, look for one with the ADA Seal of Acceptance.
  • Fluoride varnish can prevent about one-third (33%) of cavities in the primary (baby) teeth.
  • Children living in communities with fluoridated tap water have fewer cavities than children whose water is not fluoridated.
  • Children who brush daily with fluoride toothpaste will have fewer cavities.
  • Dental sealants can also prevent cavities for many years. Applying dental sealants to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth prevent 80% of cavities.

 

Call Community Health Net to schedule your child’s dental exam today! Call (814) 456-8548.

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness in the United States. People at risk for glaucoma need to know what steps they can take to help protect their vision.

Get The Facts

What is glaucoma?
Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that can cause vision loss and blindness by damaging a nerve in the back of your eye called the optic nerve. The symptoms can start so slowly that you may not notice them. Therefore, the only way to find out if you have glaucoma is to get a comprehensive dilated eye exam. There’s no cure for glaucoma, but early treatment can often stop the damage and protect your vision.

What are the types of glaucoma?
There are many different types of glaucoma, but the most common type in the United States is called open-angle glaucoma. It’s what most people mean when they talk about glaucoma. Other types are less common, like angle-closure glaucoma and congenital glaucoma.

What are the symptoms of glaucoma?
At first, glaucoma doesn’t usually have any symptoms. That’s why half of the people with glaucoma don’t even know they have it. Over time, you may slowly lose vision, usually starting with your side (peripheral) vision — especially the part of your vision that’s closest to your nose. Because it happens so slowly, many people can’t tell that their vision is changing at first. But as the disease gets worse, you may start to notice that you can’t see things off to the side anymore. Without treatment, glaucoma can eventually cause blindness.

Am I at risk for glaucoma?
Anyone can get glaucoma, but some people are at higher risk. You’re at higher risk if you:

  • Are over age 60, especially if you’re Hispanic/Latino.
  • Are African American and over age 40.
  • Have a family history of glaucoma.

Talk with your doctor about your risk for glaucoma, and ask how often you need to get checked. For example, you need to get a comprehensive dilated eye exam every 1 to 2 years if you’re at higher risk.

What causes glaucoma?

Scientists aren’t sure what causes the most common types of glaucoma. Still, many people with glaucoma have high eye pressure — and treatments that lower eye pressure helps slow the disease. But, unfortunately, there’s no way to prevent glaucoma. That’s why eye exams are so important — so you and your doctor can find it before it affects your vision.

Take Action

How will my eye doctor check for glaucoma?

Eye doctors can check for glaucoma as part of a comprehensive dilated eye exam. The exam is painless and straightforward. Your doctor will give you some eye drops to dilate (widen) your pupil and then check your eyes for glaucoma and other eye problems. The exam includes a visual field test to check your side vision.

What’s the treatment for glaucoma?
Doctors use different types of treatment for glaucoma, including medicines (usually eye drops), laser treatment, and surgery. If you have glaucoma, it’s important to start treatment right away. Treatment won’t undo any damage to your vision, but it can stop it from getting worse.

  • Medicines. Prescription eye drops are the most common treatment. They lower the pressure in your eye and prevent damage to your optic nerve.
  • Laser treatment. Doctors can use lasers to help the fluid drain out of your eye to lower your eye pressure. It’s a simple procedure that your doctor can do in the office.
  • Surgery. Your doctor might suggest surgery if medicines and laser treatment don’t work. Several different types of surgery can help the fluid drain out of your eye.

Talk over your options with your doctor. While glaucoma is a serious disease, treatment works well. Remember these tips:

  • If your doctor prescribes medicine, be sure to take it every day.
  • Tell your doctor if your treatment causes side effects.
  • See your doctor for regular check-ups.
  • If you’re having trouble with everyday activities because of your vision loss, ask your doctor about vision rehabilitation services or devices that could help.
  • Encourage family members to get checked for glaucoma since it can run in families.

Call Community Health Net to schedule your eye exam today! Call (814) 455-7222. 

Our health information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Please be advised that this information is made available to assist the public in learning more about their health. Community Health Net providers may not see and/or treat all topics found herein.

Health Facts is a public service partnership of Community Health Net and CF Cares of Country Fair Stores, Inc.

Community Health Net Welcomes Dr. Steven R. Do

Steven R. Do, DO, MBA, AAHIVS, joined Community Health Net in December 2021. He is a fellowship-trained, board-certified physician in Infectious Disease, HIV/AIDS Medicine, and Internal Medicine. Dr. Do is providing HIV/AIDS & Primary Care Services in the Ryan White Clinic, located at Daniel S. Snow, M.D. Health Center, 1202 State Street, Erie, PA 16501.

Dr. Do grew up in Texas. He graduated from Elsik High School in Houston, TX, with the highest honor. He obtained his Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biomedical Sciences and Master of Business Administration (MBA) with high honors from Texas A&M University in College Station, TX, and University of the People in Pasadena, CA, respectively.

Dr. Do graduated with the Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO) from Lincoln Memorial University DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine in Harrogate, TN, before pursuing additional training in Internal Medicine residency at the University of North Texas Health Science Center-Corpus Christi Medical Center in Corpus Christi, TX, and Infectious Disease fellowship at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine-Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, MI.

Dr. Do served as a Clinical Instructor in Medicine and received the Outstanding Fellow in Teaching Award of the Year 2021 from Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. He is a member of the American Osteopathic Association, Infectious Disease Society of America, American Academy of HIV Medicine, and American College of Osteopathic Internists.

 

Make an appointment with Dr. Do today!

Location:
Daniel S. Snow, M.D. Health Center

Get Your Health Back on Track!

 

During the last few months, has your healthcare taken a backseat? Yet, would you agree that your overall wellness is more important than ever before? Well, why not make your health a priority today?

“Get Your Health Back On Track!” by calling Community Health Net! We offer quality Medical, Dental, Vision, Behavioral Health, and Pharmacy services, regardless of your ability to pay! In addition to COVID-19 testing and vaccination services, we have vaccine educational resources to help you make an informed decision about your family’s health!. And we have a great team of healthcare providers that care and will give you the dignity and respect that YOU expect!

To schedule an appointment today, just dial (814) 455-7222. Our representatives will be happy to assist you. Or, click here to send an email to our team.

 

Schedule an Appointment Today!

Learn More about Our COVID-19 Resources.

 

New Patient Concierge Service

We are proud to introduce a new Patient Concierge Service from Community Health Net! We now provide free transportation to and from your appointments for patients of our 1202 State Street location, with walk-up, door-to-door service! To request our Patient Concierge Service, call 814-455-7222, or speak to a member of your Care Team during your next visit!

More Information

  • You must live within a 10-mile radius of our 1202 State Street location.
  • You must be a patient at our 1202 State Street location.
  • Our Patient Concierge Service operates on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 9 am until 3:30 pm.
  • You must submit a request for our Patient Concierge Service 24 hours before your appointment time.

Community Health Net Reports Record 2020-2021 Fiscal Year with $4.4m in Net Assets, Grows Cash Reserves by 50 Percent

The organization continues to show improvement in cash flow and liquidity. 

 

Erie, Pa. – October 26, 2021 – Community Health Net (CHN), the leading Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) serving the Lake Erie region, announced that it ended its fiscal year at its strongest financial position to date, with $4.4m in net assets. Additionally, CHN grew its cash reserves by 50% and implemented telehealth services while experiencing burdens generated by the pandemic.

“The pandemic years of 2020 and 2021 have thus far been very stressful on all of us and especially our community’s and nation’s healthcare system. At CHN, we have faced this challenging event head-on to improve the quality of life for the residents in our region,“ said Craig Ulmer, CEO of Community Health Net.  “We are committed to doing what needs to be done for our community’s health and well-being during these uncertain times. Although this has proven to be a difficult task, we have succeeded.“

Before the pandemic, CHN had significantly changed its culture, streamlined operations, and improved its patient services.  These efforts have resulted in many public successes, including Community Health Net being named “Best-in-Class Equity Performer” by the Pennsylvania Department of Health in 2021.  Additionally, the changes gave the organization the agility to successfully navigate the pandemic, provide quality health services, and remain financially strong.

“As reflected in the key performance indicators, CHN continues to show improvement in cash flow and liquidity. From a trending perspective, and due in part to a number of the [grant] awards, our cash reserves grew by 50%, and our ratio climbed to 4.05,” said Cindy DeDionisio, Chief Financial Officer at Community Health Net. “Even while dealing with the impact of the pandemic, we were able to maintain the days in accounts receivable at 30 days. This is a positive indication of our strengthening cash and is exceedingly better than the typical metric for most health centers. In addition, CHN continues to excel in financial compliance through numerous successful audits and fiscal site visit reviews.”

While the pandemic hindered some growth efforts, Community Health Net moved quickly to serve its community through COVID testing and vaccinations. As a result, the organization added over 1000 new patients, provided nearly 6000 vaccinations (including 1st doses, 2nd doses, and several boosters). In addition, through a diverse menu of healthcare services, including telehealth options, CHN provided more than 36,000 patient visits and nearly 30,000 pharmacy prescriptions.

 

About Community Health Net
Community Health Net is a Federally Qualified Health Center with seven locations and greater than 35 years of service. CHN is the preeminent, community-focused healthcare network advancing the wellness of the Lake Erie Region.  Its mission is to improve the region’s quality of life by providing professional healthcare services with compassion, respect, and dignity to all.

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